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Why concrete floors are the bomb

Hydronic Heating is a method of heating utilising heated water to distribute warmth throughout a building. It offers superior comfort, operational efficiency and silent operation and is also known to minimise the negative effects to allergy sufferers caused by circulation of airborne particles, such as pollen or dust, that occur in ducted heating systems.

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Concrete floors in our homes is on the rise. They are fast becoming a popular choice for many reasons. Not only do they look sleek and modern, they are pretty easy to look after.
Surprisingly, they aren’t as cold, prison-like or industrial as some may think. They can be warm, inviting and textured – especially if you do it right!

Here is a list of why I think they rock…

Sustainable
Concrete floors are a good option if you use an existing concrete slab – therefore, you won’t need to add new materials to your home. Maybe you’ve ripped up your carpet and realise there’s a great slab underneath. All you need to do is sand them down and polish/seal them. Layer the floor with a gorgeous rug and you’ll have a fabulous warm look.

Cleaning
They are so easy to look after. My sister recently did her entire house in concrete. She has little kids but the floors rarely shows the dirt and slops! A quick vacuum and the occasionally mop with soapy water keeps them looking great.

Looks
Decoratively, the floors can all look different. From throwing a tint in to the mix, to adding different sized pebbles. The finish can be endless. You can have a wet look, or dull looking finishes depending on the type of sealer used.

Enviro
Concrete is good for our environment – they are eco-friendly. Concrete does not deplete natural resources, it requires less energy than other floor types to produce, and is made (and poured) locally. Such a bonus.

Manage
They are fire resistant, won’t stain and repels water, bacteria and smells. Plus it won’t scratch!

Heating
Concrete floors do need to be heated in large areas. Instead of putting heaters in your ceiling if you’re thinking of building a new home, you should consider hydronic heating. It’s efficient, comfortable, and healthy, and the most commonly used heating method worldwide. Hydronic heating uses heated water to transmit warmth within a home via radiator panels or piping in a concrete slab floor. Hydronic heating is excellent for asthmatics and allergy sufferers as there is no dust or air particles being blown around like a gas heater from the ceiling can. Bosch is a worldwide leader in the design and manufacture of high quality hydronic heating Boilers and accessories. In Australia Bosch has teamed up with a network of reputable installer companies who can install hydronic heating for your home.  Bosch is also introducing a unique smart heating controller, the Bosch CT100, which will allow you to control your hydronic heating system from your smart phone. This will provide amazing flexibility to adjust the comfort of your home at any time, from any place, anywhere in the world. Such a fabulous addition to any new home. You can see a little video here on how that works.

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This post is part of a Nuffnang native advertising series.

Hydronic Heating is a method of heating utilising heated water to distribute warmth throughout a building. It offers superior comfort, operational efficiency and silent operation and is also known to minimise the negative effects to allergy sufferers caused by circulation of airborne particles, such as pollen or dust, that occur in ducted heating systems.

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1 Comment

  1. Reply

    Alison Burgess

    October 28, 2015

    Omg! Today I met with my builder who has recommended hydronic heating…here I am laying in bed researching hydronic heating, flick over to FB and here’s this article. Fate?
    So here’s my concern…. It appears its to risky to have floating floor boards, and I don’t like tiles in living areas, so have been thinking about concrete; However, have been warned against concrete as its too unpredictable (cracks etc)…??
    I’m now also curious of cost of concrete vs floating timber?
    Any recommendations or suggestions most welcome.

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