I am basically a finance guru

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I am basically a finance guru

I am basically a finance guru. I’m not really, but I’ve been giving it a good hard crack over the last month. I mentioned few weeks ago I’d read The Barefoot Investor twice in two days. My husband was away camping so I had some time up my sleeve and this book had a hold on me. Where have I been?? Under a rock obviously.

So, over the last few weeks I have been busy changing EVERYTHING. I manage the money in our house so it’s always been left to me. I have never done a top job, but I’ve always done a pretty ok job. My husband deals with his business, and I do our home stuff. The reason my husband doesn’t ‘do’ money is because he still lives in 1985, and freaks out if he has to use an ATM or a PIN. Recently I managed to get him to use paywave so at this stage he can buy anything as long as it’s under $100. Ha! He’d much prefer cash because he has an irrational fear that his card won’t work for some reason!

Anyhoo…. have you read The Barefoot Investor? If so, then you’ve probably done what I’ve just done… Set up new bank accounts and your “buckets”?

Then I bet you checked your super, all your insurances, phone deals, energy deals etc?? I did! And boy what a task that was! BUT I managed to get pretty much every single thing reduced, or I just switched to something new. I did ring my husband after every single win and he was so pumped! He kept cheering me on.

I even made an excel spreadsheet of all of our ‘non-negotiables’ – these are the things that I cannot change (mortgage, insurances, health fund, school fees etc). Who am I??!! 😉

I didn’t follow every single either. I just took what I needed from the book. I was also particularly interested in some ideas for my boys when they start working. There were good tips.

It’s taken a good part of 4 weeks to get all these changes in place. I had to switch where wages were being paid, ring all the direct debit companies and change those. It also meant I had to change Medicare payments, Paypal, Afterpay, online Lotto.. so many things that I didn’t think of at the time.

But in doing all of that I really took stock of everything. I became so aware of where money was going and it felt bloody good. We just live like everyone else with a mortgage and normal bills. We don’t have credit cards or personal loans, but we don’t have massive savings either. That’s my goal – to get some good savings. That is HARD though when I am a freelancer and it comes in waves. I think about this allllllll the time. While freelance is good in some respects, sometimes I think I’d like a normal job to depend on the money (and not lose so much sleep haha). So I have really had to adjust that excel spreadsheet and my “buckets” to suit.

I will say that starting out 2018 with these new little money tricks thanks to a really simple book I read has been refreshing. Once I got started I was on a roll.

Have you read the book? I’d love to hear about your experiences? Have you changed just about everything?? ♥ KC.

This is not a sponsored post and I have no affiliates. Just sharing!

About the author
I'm a mum to 3 wild boys, a lover of pretty things & addicted to Instagram. My blog is about sharing pieces of my life & capturing moments as they happen.

47 Comments

  1. Yes I’m reading it for the umteenth time.
    When I rang the mentioned banks they knew instantly when I was using mojo terms etc lol
    I’ve set up the accounts but scared to take the nxt step.
    I did the mojo transfer sum then panicked as I’ve always been with a major bank for years and they have done me NO favours.
    Soooo I rang the mojo bank and I transferred my money back to my major bank. In a panic because I couldn’t ‘see’ that money. Yes. I know. That the POINT!!!
    I’m a creature of habit!!

    Anyway, I turn up to work using words like:
    Off set account (omg I felt sooo good when people were like WT? Is that?)
    5.5% super ontop of
    Lol

    I’m finally starting to feel in control but my mind is outta control with serviette theories on my mind

    I too, need to change all my direct debits, pay etc etc etc and that’s the part holding me back is the fear of missing a mortgage or insurance payment during the transition.

    I need to read the book a few times more in its entirety to make this final step.

    I’m a bit choked up thinking about my slush fund at the end of the Week
    Looks like a half baked pedicure coming my way from now on
    Perhaps I could just get one foot one week done then the other the next???

    Anyway… thanks for the post. It’s given me a kick along to get back on task.
    I guess I’ll be seeing ya all at Aldi!!!!!

    Btw I had to skip his stories and get to the nuts n bolts…
    Ain’t no body got time for dem stories…

  2. I spent a few hours researching and on phone calls. Have managed to save $2550 a year by negotiating mortgage rate, insurance and electricity/gas. Next to do is phone/internet providers. Brilliant book! Thanks for sharing, as it was your initial post on this that prompted me to buy the book.

  3. I’m happy to report after following Dave Ramsey for many years there were not many changes needed to our finances, I think I might get it out at the library to read through the the new version for any extra tips though. The biggest thing for me was the extras on health insurance.

  4. Read it over the holidays and have implemented some of the things but not all. I think the best thing to come from it is just being more mindful of where our money is going.

  5. Easy read in plain English with some really practical tips. I contacted my bank recently and managed to get a rate reduction on my mortgage which is great. I’ve got a ‘to do list’ I’m currently working through.

  6. LOVE LOVE this! I did some research after you posted about it the other week. I brought it a couple days later for my husband and I. He read it first in like 3 nights. He hasn’t read a book in the 11 years we have been together! I then read it in 3 nights too! So captivating, simple and easy to read! Great advice! We have yet to get out barefoot date nights sorted with two very young children but we plan to get the ball rolling soon!

  7. Read it, loved it and actioned it. Had 3 weeks off over January so made use of that time and made phone call after phone call changing plans. Every single utility was a win win. Set up splurge for my husband and I, set up excel spreadsheet and even kids are sorted. When you read it you will feel overwhelmed, but you will feel so in control of your expenses afterwards. We all know life is expensive in general but by managing your money the BFI way it all just makes sense how much money we actually waste. Go on read it, action it and you will love it !!!! Just don’t get scared how long it takes remember everybody has different financial circumstances. It is a book for everybody and might not happen overnight but it will certainly happen 💫. Thanks KC for sharing and good luck people on your financial journey in 2018 it taught me a thing or two 😊

  8. Hi Katrina,
    I love how the barefoot investor targets everyday people, not just wealthy, as I am on a low income but my husbands pay tends to balance us but we never have any savings too. We seem to put everything in our home loan and struggle week to week, this is the second time I’ve read the book but this time I have set everything up, just waiting for my new cards to arrive and start saving. I didn’t end up changing banks as my bank has no fees and good deals, so it has been easier but I feel like l’m finally in control of my money and think more about my spending and what I really want. My kids are teenagers and I’m getting their jars sorted too and I look forward to them making better financial decision then we did.
    Good luck and thanks for sharing.
    Melissa

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